INAH removed shell sculpture in Alameda de Santa María la Ribera

INAH and the Ministry of Culture remove advertising elements in the Alameda de Santa María la Ribera (Photo: Government of Mexico City / National Institute of Anthropology and History.)

the brand of bread bimbo placed advertising objects in the Moorish Kiosk of the Alameda of Santa Maria la Ribera without prior authorization from National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH).

According to the Federal Law on Monuments and Archaeological, Artistic and Historical Zonesthe INAH It is the body with the obligation to care for, protect, conserve and safeguard these spaces and those nearby that have a historical or heritage value.

The Ministry of Culture of Mexicothe INAH and the CDMX Government asked the authorities for support Mayor Cuauhtemoc to immediately remove the statue of sweet bread that damages sets with heritage value.

the authorities of the Cuauhtémoc mayor's office went to remove the publicity that monopolized places of historical and cultural value in the Alameda de Santa María la Ribera (Photo: INAH)
the authorities of the Cuauhtémoc mayor’s office went to remove the publicity that monopolized places of historical and cultural value in the Alameda de Santa María la Ribera (Photo: INAH)

To carry out any intervention in the Alameda of Santa Maria la Ribera The project must be presented and the corresponding authorization must be requested from the federal government agency.

The respective staff came to remove said objects this afternoon of June 13, 2022. For its part, the INAH and the Ministry of Culture They reiterated their commitment to maintain permanent dialogue and a close relationship with different government entities, in order to guarantee a responsible and respectful use of spaces with high cultural and historical value.

And it is that the Alameda de Santa María la Ribera and its kiosk are in the INAH National Catalog of Real Estate Historical Monuments, for its architectural value and other elements. The call Moorish It is the only work of the Mexican engineer Jose Ramon Ibarrola.

Kioko Morisco built in 1884 by José Ramón Ibarrola (Photo: INAH)
Kioko Morisco built in 1884 by José Ramón Ibarrola (Photo: INAH)

The problem started when users on social networks shared several photographs of a sweet bread sculpture in the form of a shell, submerged in a cup of coffee, near the Moorish Kiosk in the Alameda.

Residents expressed their annoyance that the signs were removed from food stalls but that they do allow brands such as bimbo place your sculptures anywhere. For that reason Sandra Cuevasthe mayor of Cuauhtémoc, got much more criticism and was nicknamed Lady Conch.

For his part, the journalist Hernan Gomez Bruera stated in Twitter that the mayor had committed an illegal act:Could it be that @AlcCuauhtemocMx doesn’t know that this is absolutely illegal? The mayors they cannot authorize forms of outdoor advertising prohibited by law (in this case volumetric advertising). Nor can they do so in Heritage Conservation Areas. Heloooooooooooo,” she condemned.

Shell sculpture in the Alameda de Santa María la Ribera (Photo: Twitter/ @CitlaHM)
Shell sculpture in the Alameda de Santa María la Ribera (Photo: Twitter/ @CitlaHM)

The kiosk was built in 1884 to function as a pavilion at the international exposition in New OrleansUnited States, that same year and was also used in the Paris World’s Fair and in the Saint Louis Missouri Fair in 1904.

After being in various exhibitions around the world and fulfilling its mission, its structure was brought from New Mexico and installed in the south side of the Alameda Centralright in front of the former Corpus Christi Temple. Until 1910 it was moved to its current location and definitively, in Santa María la Ribera.

The Morisco Santa María la Ribera Kiosk is a cultural and historical heritage of Mexico (Photo: Instagram/@denissolanz)
The Morisco Santa María la Ribera Kiosk is a cultural and historical heritage of Mexico (Photo: Instagram/@denissolanz)

Around the eighties, the statue was moved to the north end of the Alameda where it can be found today.

The space has historical elements such as litter bins, cast iron benches, fountains and more. It is because of that this place has a high symbolic level and both historical and national identity that must be preserved and respected.

Neither Sandra Cuevas nor the company bimbo They have made a statement regarding the controversy. Meanwhile he Government of Mexico City issued the Outdoor Advertising Law CDMX, which aims to regulate and remove advertising media in public space.

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