“AEIOU – The Fast Alphabet of Love”: Old woman meets young man who stole from her!

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“AEIOU”: Old woman meets young man who stole from her!

By Stefan Broehl

Germany – taboo subject! “AEIOU – The Fast Alphabet of Love” runs on June 16th in German cinemas and focuses on the love between an older woman and a young man. the TAG24 film review.

Anna (Sophie Rois, 60, l.) and Adrian (Milan Herms) quickly get closer. © PR/Komplizen Film./Reinhold Vorschneider

At the beginning, actress Anna (Sophie Rois, 60) is seen, who is encouraged to identify a thief during a police confrontation by Commissioner Gregori (Nicolas Bridet).

Although she recognizes a young man, the actress says nothing. Instead, she leaves the station and talks about love from the off. “Everything starts with ‘A’. Life, pain, knowledge and love.”

She continues: “People say ‘A’ when they understand and when they are overwhelmed by desire. ‘A’ is the sound that you can’t stop, the ‘A’ is always there.”

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Even when the educated lady wanted to go to a Berlin restaurant and was deliberately bumped into by a mugger, Anna screamed “Aaaah”.

Fortunately, a couple attached themselves to the heels of the thief, confronted him and got the stolen handbag back. Nevertheless, Anna is upset and lets her neighbor and landlord Michel (Udo Kier, 77) comfort her. Because her day was bad before that. She stopped recording an audio book because her acting partner kissed her against her will.

When she meets an acquaintance a little later, he asks her to teach the 17-year-old orphan boy Adrian (Milan Herms) as a language teacher. Since the pay is good, she accepts – and faces whoever robbed her! Adrian has never arrived in life, has caused trouble many times, has had three foster families in two years and has ADHD. But despite (or because of?) all the differences, sparks fly between him and Anna…

Trailer for “AEIOU – The Fast Alphabet of Love” with Sophie Rois, Milan Herms and Udo Kier

“AEIOU – The Fast Alphabet of Love” is a light-footed and lively film

Adrian (Milan Herms, l.) And Anna (Sophie Rois, 60, l.) Fool around newly in love.

Adrian (Milan Herms, l.) And Anna (Sophie Rois, 60, l.) Fool around newly in love. © PR/Komplizen Film./Reinhold Vorschneider

Nicolette Krebitz (49, “Wild”) implemented this story in a great way. The Berlin director has created a heartwarming and heartfelt comedy that exudes joie de vivre thanks to its light-hearted style.

In doing so, she deals with some complex issues, but, for example, she implements the supposedly taboo subject very naturally and also in the sex scenes with feeling. In addition, she stages the two main characters in a subtle way, so that you can understand why there is such an attraction between the two and why the chemistry is right.

It is precisely this refreshing dynamic that leads to the fact that you follow “AEIOU” spellbound over the 104 minutes running time and also watch the love story with interest from this somewhat different perspective.

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Although there are occasional slacks, this is complaining at a high level. Because the wise work of Krebitz knows how to entertain, to provide funny, moving and sad moments and also to skillfully reflect on life and some challenges that almost everyone has to face.

Among other things, it is about loneliness in old age, youth’s search for meaning, feminism, struggling through, enjoying the beautiful moments, friendship, being there for other people – and of course love!

Adrian (Milan Herms, left) and Anna (Sophie Rois, 60, left) are on vacation on the Côte d'Azur in France and enjoy the wonderful view.

Adrian (Milan Herms, left) and Anna (Sophie Rois, 60, left) are on vacation on the Côte d’Azur in France and enjoy the wonderful view. © PR/Komplizen Film./Reinhold Vorschneider

The chemistry between Sophie Rois and Milan Herms is right in “AEIOU – The Fast Alphabet of Love”

Michel (Udo Kier, 77, from left) is Anna's (Sophie Rois, 60, left) landlord and good friend, and also goes to a theater performance with her.

Michel (Udo Kier, 77, from left) is Anna’s (Sophie Rois, 60, left) landlord and good friend, and also goes to a theater performance with her. © PR/Komplizen Film./Reinhold Vorschneider

The filmmaker skilfully works this wealth of topics into a plot that is easy to follow. That’s also due to Rois (“Duel – Enemy at the Gates”, “A Hidden Life”, “Barbarians”) and newcomer Herms, who harmonize well, convey their respective parts authentically and pass the balls to each other.

At her side, Kier (“The Painted Bird”, “Iron Sky: The Coming Race”) is also convincing, although his role is comparatively small.

With their timing, they all also provide some sparkling gags that result in laughter or at least a smile. The mixture of humorous and serious scenes is just right.

Here, Krebitz, with her cast and crew, did a good job of balancing the film that was screened at this year’s Berlinale. Also with regard to the tonality, which always seems appropriate.

Visually, the diverse locations ensure variety. For example, people from the German capital will discover the delphi LUX cinema at the Zoological Garden (Kantstraße 10, Yva-Bogen) at the beginning of the chase, which has a short guest appearance.

Adrian (Milan Herms, right) falls in love with Anna (Sophie Rois, 60, left), who takes good care of him.

Adrian (Milan Herms, right) falls in love with Anna (Sophie Rois, 60, left), who takes good care of him. © PR/Komplizen Film./Reinhold Vorschneider

All in all, “AEIOU – The Fast Alphabet of Love” has become a loving comedy that knows how to please with depth, wisdom, intelligence and a slightly different story focus. Since Rois and Herms also act at a good level, the film, which is well worth seeing, is fun to watch!

Cover photo: PR/Komplizen Film./Reinhold Vorschneider

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